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Accomodating strategy

Four main socio-psychological theories: Similarity-attraction The similarity-attraction theory posits that, "The more similar our attitudes and beliefs are to those of others, the more likely it is for them to be attracted to us." An individual on the receiving end of high level of accommodation is likely to develop a greater sense of self-esteem and satisfaction than being a receiver of low accommodation.

Perception is the process of attending to and interpreting a message When someone enters a conversation, usually he first observes what takes place and then decides whether he should make adjustment to fit in.

This theory is concerned with the links between language, context, and identity.

Particularly, it focused on the cognitive and affective processes underlying individuals' convergence and divergence through speech.

Causal attribution process The causal attribution theory "Suggests that we interpret other people's behavior, and evaluate the individual themselves, in terms of the motivations and intentions that we attribute as the cause of their behavior" It applies to convergence in that convergence might be viewed positively or negatively depending on the causes we attribute to it: "Although interpersonal convergence is generally favorably received, and non-convergence generally unfavorably received, the extent to which this holds true will undoubtedly be influenced by the listeners attributions of the speaker's intent." Giles and Smith provide the example of an experiment that they conducted amongst French and English speaking Canadians to illustrate this.

In this experiment, when individuals believed that the person from the different group used language convergence to reduce cultural barriers, they evaluated it more positively than when they attributed it to the pressures of the situation.

When two people who speak different languages try to have a conversation, the language they agree to communicate with is more likely to be the one used by the higher status person.

This idea of "salient social membership" negotiation is well illustrated in the situation of an interview as the interviewee usually makes all efforts to identify with the interviewer by accommodating the way he speaks and behaves so that he can have more chance to secure the job.

Communication accommodation theory (CAT) is a theory of communication developed by Howard Giles.